Matthew Time

Herod the Great begins to rule  Jesus is
born
 Herod the Great dies Escape to
Egypt
 Return to NazarethJudea
becomes a Roman
province 
 Jesus 
visits Temple 
as a boy
 Tiberius
Caesar
becomes emperor
Pontius Pilate appointed
governor
 
 Jesus begins
his
ministry
 Jesus choose
twelve
disciples
 Jesus feeds 
5,000
 Jesus is crucified rises again and ascends
37 B.C6/5 B.C  4 B.C 5/4 B.C 4/3 B.C 6 A.D 6/7
14  26 26/27 28 29 30




Vital statistics


 Purpose: To prove that Jesus is the Messiah, the eternal King
 Author: Matthew (Levi)
 Original audience: Matthew wrote especially to the Jews
 Date written: Approximately A.D. 60-65
 Setting: Matthew was a Jewish tax collector who become one of Jesus disciples. This Gospel forms the connecting link between the Old and New Testaments because of its emphasis on the fulfillment of prophecy.  
 Key verse: "Don't misunderstand why I have come. I did not come to abolish the law of Moses or the writings of the prophets. No, I came to accomplish their purpose" (5:17). 
 Key people: Jesus, Mary, Joseph, John the Baptist, the disciples, the religious leaders, Caiaphas, Pilate, Mary Magdalene.  
 Key places: Bethlehem, Jerusalem, Capernaum, Galilee, Judea 
 Special features: Matthew is filed with messianic language ("Son of David" is used throughout) and Old Testament references (53 quotes and 76 other references). This Gospel was not written as a chronological account; its purpose was to present the clear evidence that Jesus is the Messiah, the Savior.  
 



Two Different Rich Men


Rich Young Ruler
Matthew
Probably enjoyed inherited wealth
Rich most likely because of his work as a tax collector
Had lived a good life
Like most tax collectors, was probably dishonest and ruthless
Came to Jesus
Sat at his tax table; Jesus approached him
Displayed interest in spiritual things
Was collecting money when Jesus found him
Indicated a willingness to make sacrifices to gain eternal life
Gave no such indication
Word in life study Bible . Nashville: Thomas Nelson.




The Twelve


Apostle
Description
Simon (Peter) (Mark 1:16)
Fisherman from Galilee, Andrew’s brother
Andrew (John 1:40)
Fisherman from Galilee, Peter’s brother
James
Son of Zebedee, brother to James; from Capernaum
John (Introduction to John)
Son of Zebedee, brother to James, from Capernaum
Philip
From Bethsaida
Bartholomew (Nathanael)
From Cana in Galilee
Thomas (Didymus)
Possibly also a fisherman
Matthew (Levi) (Introduction to Matthew)
Tax collector in Capernaum; son of Alphaeus, possibly James’s brother
James
Son of Alphaeus, possibly Matthew’s brother
Lebbaeus Thaddaeus (Judas)
May have taken the name Thaddaeus (“warm-hearted”) because of the infamy that came to be attached to the name Judas
Simon (the Cananite)
From Cana; one of the Zealots, Jewish revolutionaries who opposed Rome
Judas Iscariot (Matt. 26:14)
From Kerioth, and possibly the only Judean among the Twelve
Word in life study Bible .. Nashville: Thomas Nelson.



 The Names of Jesus


The voice that the disciples heard during the Transfiguration said that Jesus was “My beloved Son” (Matt. 17:5). This term indicates a unique relationship that Jesus has with God the Father. Elsewhere Scripture calls Jesus by other names and titles to indicate other aspects of His nature, character, and roles:
Name or Title
Description
Adam (1 Cor. 15:45)
The first Adam brought death through sin; Jesus, “the last Adam, ” brought life through His righteousness.
The Alpha and the Omega (Rev. 21:6)
Jesus is eternal, “The Beginning and the End. ” Alpha is the first letter in the Greek alphabet, omega is the last.
Apostle (Heb. 3:1)
“Messenger. ” Jesus came to bring the good news of salvation to humanity.
The bread of life (John 6:35, 48)
Jesus is the heavenly manna, the spiritual food, given by the Father to those who ask for it.
The chief cornerstone (Eph. 2:20)
Jesus is the foundation of the church.
The Chief Shepherd (1 Pet. 5:4)
The title that Peter called Jesus, indicating His oversight of His “flock, ” the church.
The Christ (Matt. 1:1, 17; 16:16; Luke 2:11; John 1:41)
From the Greek word Christos, “Messiah” or “Anointed One. ” Jesus fulfills the Old Testament promise of a Messiah.
The Consolation of Israel (Luke 2:25)
Jesus came to bring comfort to the nation (Is. 40:1–2).
The firstborn from the dead (Col. 1:18)
Jesus overcame death in order to give life to believers.
The firstborn over all creation (Col. 1:15)
As God’s Son, Jesus rules over everything that exists.
The good shepherd (John 10:11, 14; compare Heb. 13:20)
An image that Jesus used to describe His relationship to His people.
The head of the body, the church (Eph. 1:22–23; 4:15–16; Col. 1:18)
Jesus is the leader of His people and the source of their life.
High Priest (Heb. 3:1)
Like the Old Testament high priest, Jesus stands between God and people to offer an acceptable sacrifice for sin.
The Holy One of God (Mark 1:24; John 6:69)
Jesus is the sinless Messiah promised by God.
I AM (John 8:58)
A name by which God made Himself known to Moses (Ex. 3:14), related to the verb “to be. ”
The image of the invisible God (Col. 1:15)
Jesus expresses God in bodily form.
Immanuel (Matt. 1:23)
“God with us” (Is. 7:14).
Jesus (Matt. 1:21; Luke 1:30; Acts 9:5)
The name that God instructed Joseph and Mary to call their Son.
King of kings and Lord of lords (Rev. 19:16)
The formal title that Jesus has received, indicating His supremacy as the one to whom “every knee should bow” (Phil. 2:9–11).
King of the Jews (Matt. 2:2; 27:11–12; John 19:19)
As Messiah, Jesus is Israel’s king, fulfilling God’s promises to David (2 Sam. 7:12–16).
The Lamb of God (John 1:29, 35)
Jesus became the atoning sacrifice for sin.
The light of the world (John 9:5)
Jesus brings truth and hope to light in the midst of spiritual darkness.
Lord (Luke 2:11; 1 Cor. 2:8; Phil. 2:11)
A title indicating ultimate sovereignty.
Mediator between God and men (1 Tim. 2:5)
Jesus reestablishes the relationship between God and people.
The only begotten of the Father (John 1:14)
Jesus is God’s only Son.
The Prophet (Mark 6:15; John 7:40; Acts 3:22)
Jesus is the leader that God promised to “raise up” like Moses (Deut. 18:15, 18–19)
Rabbi (John 1:38; 3:2)
Friends and enemies alike recognized Jesus as Teacher.
Savior (Luke 1:47; 2:11)
Jesus came to save people from their sins.
Seed (of Abraham; Gal. 3:16)
God made promises to Abraham and his “Seed, ” whom Paul identified as Christ (Gen. 13:15; 17:8).
The Son of Abraham (Matt. 1:1)
Jesus descended from Abraham and fulfills the promises of God to Abraham (Gen. 22:18).
The Son of David (Matt. 1:1)
Jesus descended from David and fulfills the promises of God to David (2 Sam. 7:12–16).
The Son of God (John 1:34; 9:35–37)
Jesus is one of three Persons of the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit).
The Son of Man (Matt. 18:11; John 1:51)
Though fully God, Jesus took on a human body (compare Phil. 2:5–8).
The Word (John 1:1; Rev. 19:13)
Jesus is fully God and therefore is the full expression of God.
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Mt 17.5). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.



Ordinary People Who Saw Jesus to the Cross


Simon the leper, who had been an untouchable outcast
Hosted Jesus as his houseguest (Matt. 26:6).
An unnamed woman (probably Mary of Bethany; see John 11:2; compare 12:1–8)
Used expensive ointment to anoint Jesus’ head (26:7).
An unnamed homeowner in Jerusalem
Opened his home to Jesus and the Twelve for their last meal together (26:18).
The disciples, Jesus’ chosen successors from rural Galilee
Overstated their faith (26:35); joined Jesus in a garden during the final hours before His arrest (26:40, 43, 56).
An unnamed servant girl
Asked Peter about his association with Jesus (26:69).
Another girl in the crowd
Also asked Peter about his association with Jesus (26:71).
Unnamed crowd members
Also enquired about Peter’s association with Jesus (26:71).
Judas
Betrayed Christ; later broke down with guilt and committed suicide (27:3–5).
Barabbas, a convicted criminal
Was freed instead of Jesus due to a mob’s demands (27:16, 26).
Simon of Cyrene, a man in the watching crowd
Was conscripted to carry Jesus’ cross (27:32).
Two dying robbers
Were executed with Jesus (27:38, 44).
An unnamed crowd member
Offered Jesus a drink as He was in His death throes (27:48).
An unnamed Roman centurion
Observed that Jesus must be the Son of God (27:54).
Some loyal women from Galilee
Looked on from afar (27:55–56).
Word in life study Bible , Nashville: Thomas Nelson.





The Miracles of Jesus Christ


Miracle
Matthew
Mark
Luke
John
1. Cleansing a Leper
8:2
1:40
5:12
2. Healing a Centurion’s Servant (of paralysis)
8:5
7:1
3. Healing Peter’s Mother-in-Law
8:14
1:30
4:38
4. Healing the Sick at Evening
8:16
1:32
4:40
5. Stilling the Storm
8:23
4:35
8:22
6. Demons Entering a Herd of Swine
8:28
5:1
8:26
7. Healing a Paralytic
9:2
2:3
5:18
8. Raising the ruler’s Daughter
9:18, 23
5:22, 35
8:40, 49
9. Healing the Hemorrhaging Woman
9:20
5:25
8:43
10. Healing Two Blind Men
9:27
11. Curing a Demon-Possessed, Mute Man
12:22
11:14
12. Healing a Man’s Withered Hand
12:9
3:1
6:6
13. Curing a Demon-Possessed, Blind and Mute Man
12:22
11:14
14. Feeding the Five Thousand
14:13
6:30
9:10
6:1
15. Walking of the Sea
14:25
6:48
6:19
16. Healing the Gentile Woman’s Daughter
15:21
7:24
17. Feeding the Four Thousand
15:32
8:1
18. Healing the Epileptic Boy
17:14
9:17
9:38
19. Tmeple Tax in the Fish’s Mouth
17:24
20. Healing Two Blind Men
20:30
10:46
18:35
21. Withering the Fig Tree
21:18
11:12
22. Casting Out an Unclean Spirit
1:23
4:33
23. Healing a Deaf-Mute
7:31
24. Healing a Blind Man at Bethsaida
8:22
25. Escape from the Hostile Multitude
4:30
26. Catch of Fish
5:1
27. Raising of a Widow’s Son at Nain
7:11
28. Healing the Infirm, Bent Woman
13:11
29. Healing the Man with Droplsy
14:1
30. Cleansing the Ten Lepers
17:11
31. Restoring a Servant’s Ear
22:51
32. Turning Water into Wine
2:1
33. Healing the Nobleman’s Son (of fever)
4:46
34. Healing an Infirm Man at Bethesda
5:1
35. Healing the Man Born Blind
9:1
36. Raising of Lazarus
11:43
37. Second Catch of Fish
21:1
New Geneva study Bible.  Nashville: Thomas Nelson.



The Parables of Jesus Christ


Parable
Matthew
Mark
Luke
1. Lamp Under a Basket
5:14–16
4:21, 22
8:16, 17 11:33–36
2. A Wise Man Builds on Rock and a Foolish Man Builds on Sand
7:24–27
6:47–49
3. Unshrunk (New) Cloth on an Old Garment
9:16
2:21
5:36
4. New Wine in Old Wineskins
9:17
2:22
5:37, 38
5. The Sower
13:3–23
4:2–20
8:4–15
6. The Tares (Weeds)
13:24–30
7. The Mustard Seed
13:31, 32
4:30–32
13:18, 19
8. The Leaven
13:33
13:20, 21
9. The Hidden Treasure
13:44
10. The Pearl of Great Price
13:45, 46
11. The Dragnet
13:47–50
12. The Lost Sheep
18:12–14
15:3–7
13. The Unforgiving Servant
18:23–35
14. The Laborers in the Vineyard
20:1–16
15. The Two Sons
21:28–32
16. The Wicked Vinedressers
21:33–45
12:1–12
20:9–19
17. The Wedding Feast
22:2–14
18. The Fig Tree
24:32–44
13:28–32
21:29–33
19. The Wise and Foolish Virgins
25:1–13
20. The Talents
25:14–30
21. The Growing Seed
4:26–29
22. The Absent Householder
13:33–37
23. The Creditor and Two Debtors
7:41–43
24. The Good Samaritan
10:30–37
25. A Friend in Need
11:5–13
26. The Rich Fool
12:16–21
27. The Watchful Servants
12:35–40
28. The Faithful Servant and the Evil Servant
12:42–48
29. The Barren Fig Tree
13:6–9
30. The Great Supper
14:16–24
31. building a Tower and a King making War
14:25–35
32. The Lost Coin
15:8–10
33. The Lost Son
15:11–32
34. The Unjust Steward
16:1–13
35. The Rich man and Lazarus
16:19–31
36. Unprofitable Servants
17:7–10
37. The Persistent Widow
18:1–8
38. The Pharisee and the Tax Collector
18:9–14
39. The Minas
19:11–27
New Geneva study Bible. Nashville: Thomas Nelson.



Gospel Accounts found only in Matthew


    Matthew records nine special events that are not mentioned in any of the other Gospels. In each case, the most apparent reason for Matthew's choice has to do with purpose in communicating the gospel to Jewish people. Five cases are fulfillments Old Testament prophecies (marked with asterisks). The other four would have been of particular interest to the Jews of Matthew's day.   

 PassageSubject 
  1. 1:20-24
  2. 2:1-12
  3. 2:13-15
  4. 2:16-18
  5. 27:3-10
  6. 27:19
  7. 27:52
  8. 28:11-15
  9. 28:19, 20
  •  Joseph's dream *
  • The visit of the wise man
  • Escape to Egypt *
  • Slaughter of the male children *
  • The death of Judas *
  • The dream of Pilate's wife
  • The other resurrections
  • The bribery of the guards 
  • The baptism emphasis in the great commission *



The Pharisees and Sadducees


    The Pharisees and Sadducees were two major religious groups in Israel at the time of Christ. The Pharisees were more religiously minded, while the Sadducees were more politically minded. Although the groups disliked and distrusted each other, they became allies in their common hatred for Jesus      

Name  Positive Characteristics Negative Characteristics 
 PHARISEES
  • Were committed to obeying all of God's commands
  • Were admired by the common people for their apparent piety 
  • Believed in a bodily resurrection and eternal life
  • Believed in angels and demons   
  • Behaved as though their own religious rules were just as important as God's rules for living 
  • Their piety was often hypocritial, and their efforts often forced others to try to live up to standards they themselves could not live up to 
  • Believed that salvation came from perfect obedience to the law and was not based on forgiveness os sins
  • Became so obsessed with obeying their legal interpretation in every detail that they completely ignored God's message of mercy and grace
  • Were more concerned with appearing to be good than obeying God 
 SADDUCEES
  •  Believed strongly in the law of Moses and in Levitical purity
  • Were more practically minded than the Pharisees 
  • Relied on logic while placing little importance on faith
  • Did not believe all the Old Testament was God's Word
  • Did not believe in a bodily resurrection or eternal life 
  • Did not believe in angels or demons
  • Were often willing to compromise their values with the Romans and others in order to maintain their status and influential positions  




Key Lessons from the Sermon on the Mount



 Beatitude Old Testament anticipation Clashing worldly values God's reward Ho to develop this attitude 
 Realize need for God (5:3) Isaiah 57:15 Pride and personal independence  Kingdom of Heaven James 4:7-10
 Mourn (5:4) Isaiah 61:1, 2 Happiness at any cost Confort (2 Corinthians 1:4) Psalms 51
James 4:7-10
 Humble (5:5) Psalm 37:5-11   Power Inherit the earth Matthew 11:27-30
 Hunger and thirst for justice (5:6) Isaiah 11:4, 5; 42:1-4 Pursuing personal needs Satisfied  John 16:5-11
 Philippians 3:7-11
 Merciful (5:7) Psalm 41:1 Strength without feeling  Be shown mercy  Ephesians 5:1, 2
 Pure hearts (5:8) Psalms 24:3, 4; 51:10 Deception is acceptable See God 1 John 3:1-3
 Work for peace (5:9) Isaiah 57:18, 19; 60:17 Personal peace is pursued without concern for the word's chaos  Be called children of God Romans 12:9-21
 Hebrews 12:10, 11
 Persecuted (5:10) Isaiah 52:13; 53:12 Weak commitments  Kingdom of Heaven 2 Timothy 3:12





The Blueprint



  1. Birth and Preparation of Jesús, the King

         (1:1-4:11)


The people of Israel were waiting for the Messiah, their king. Matthew begins his book by showing how Jesús Christ was a descendant of David. But Matthew goes on to show that God did not send Jesus to be an earthly king but a heavenly King. His Kingdom would be much greater than David’s because it would never end. Event at Jesus’ birth, many recognized him as a King. Herod,the ruler, as well as Satan, was afraid of Jesus’ kingship and tried to stop him, but others worshiped him and brought royal gifts. We must be willing to recognize Jesus for who he really is and worship him as King of our life.      

  1. MESSAGE AND MINISTRY OF JESÚS, THE KING (4:12-25:46)

    1. Jesus begins his ministry

    2. Jesus gives the Sermon on the Mount

    3. Jesus performs many miracles

    4. Jesus teaches about the Kingdom

    5. Jesus encounters differing reactions to his ministry

    6. Jesus faces conflict with the religious leaders

    7. Jesus teaches on the Mount of Olives  

Jesús gave the Sermon on the Mount, directions for living in his Kingdom. He also told many parables about the difference between his Kingdom and the kingdoms of earth. Forgiveness, peace, and putting others first are some of the characteristics that make one great in the Kingdom of God. And to be great in God’s Kingdom, we must live by God’s standards right now. Jesus came to show us how to lives as faithful subjects in his Kingdom.  

  1. DEATH AND RESURRECTIONS OF JESÚS THE KING

         (26:1-28:20)

Jesús was formally presented to the nation of Israel but was rejected. How strange for the King to be accused, arrested, and crucified. But Jesus demonstrated his power, even over death, through his resurrection and gained access for us into his Kingdom. With all his evidence that Jesús is God’s Son, we, too, should accept him as our Lord.