Herod the Great begins to ruleJesus is born Escape to Egypt Herod the Great dies  Return to NazarethJesus visits Temple as a boy  Tiberius Caesar becomes emperor John's ministry begins  Jesus begins his ministry Jesus chooses twelve disciplesJesus feeds 5,000 Jesus is crucified, rises again, and ascends 
37 B.C.  6/5 B.C5/4 B.C 4 B.C. 4/3 B.C.  A.D. 6/7 14 26 26/27 2829  30



Vital statistics


 Purpose: To present the person, work, and teachings of Jesus
 Author: John Mark, He was not one of the 12 disciples, but he accompanied Paul on his first missionary journey (Acts 13:13). 
 Original audience: The Christians in Rome, where the Gospel was written
 Date written: Between AD. 55 and 65
 Setting: The Roman Empire under Tiberius Caesar. The empire, with its common language and excellent transportation and communication systems, was ripe to hear Jesus' message, which spread quickly from nation to nation. 
 Key verse: "For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve others and to give his life as a ransom for many" (10:45).
 Key people: Jesus, the 12 disciples, Pilate, the Jewish religious leaders 
 Key places: Capernaum, Nazareth, Caesarea Philippi, Jericho, Bethany, Mount of Olives, Jerusalem, Golgotha  
 Special features: Mark was probably the first Gospel written. The other Gospels quote all but 31 verses of Mark. Mark records more  miracles than does any other Gospel.



Pagan Gods in the New Testament


Name
Description
Reference
BEELZEBUB
A heathen god considered by the Jews to be the supreme evil spirit.
Mark 3:22
DIANA
In Roman mythology, the goddess of the moon, hunting, wild animals, and virginity.
Acts 19:24, 27–28
HERMES
The Greek god of commerce, science, invention, cunning, eloquence, and theft.
Acts 14:12
MAMMON
The Aramaic word for riches, personified by Jesus as a false god.
Luke 16:9, 11
MOLOCH
National god of the Ammonites whose worship involved child sacrifice.
Acts 7:43
REMPHAN
An idol worshiped by Israel in the wilderness.
Acts 7:43
TWIN BROTHERS
In Greek mythology, the twin sons of Zeus.
Acts 28:11
ZEUS
The supreme god of the ancient Greeks.
Acts 14:12–13
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Mr 3.31). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.



The Miracles of Jesus


“No sign [miracle] shall be given to this generation!” Jesus declared to the Pharisees (Mark 8:12). Jesus wanted to avoid giving in to His opponents’ demand for a miracle, but He had performed plenty of miracles already and would perform many more, as the following table shows:
Miracle
Matthew
Mark
Luke
John
Healed a leper
8:2–4
1:40–45
5:12–16
Healed a centurion’s servant
8:5–13
7:1–10
Healed Peter’s mother-in-law
8:14–15
1:29–31
4:38–39
Healed the sick in the evening
8:16–17
1:32–34
4:40–41
Stilled the storm
8:23–27
4:35–41
8:22–25
Cast out demons and sent them into swine
8:28–34
5:1–20
8:26–39
Healed a paralytic
9:1–8
2:1–12
5:18–26
Raised Jairus’s daughter
9:18–19, 23–26
5:22–24, 35–43
8:40–42, 49–56
Healed a woman with a hemorrhage
9:20–22
5:25–34
8:43–48
Healed two blind men
9:27–31
Healed a demon-possessed, mute man
9:32–33
Healed a man with a withered hand
12:9–14
3:1–6
6:6–11
Healed a demon-possessed, blind, and mute man
12:22
11:14
Fed more than 5, 000 people
14:13–21
6:30–44
9:10–17
6:1–14
Walked on the Sea of Galilee
14:22–27
6:45–52
6:16–21
Enabled Peter to walk on the Sea of Galilee
14:28–33
Healed the Syro-Phoenician woman’s daughter
15:21–28
7:24–30
Fed more than 4, 000 people
15:32–39
8:1–10
Healed an epileptic boy
17:14–18
9:17
9:38–42
Sent Peter to find a coin in a fish’s mouth
17:24–27
Healed two blind men near Jericho
20:29–34
Caused a fig tree to wither
21:18–19
11:12–14, 20–21
Returned from the dead
28:1–10
16:1–14
24:1–43
20:1–29
Cast out an unclean spirit
1:23–28
4:33–37
Healed a deaf mute
7:31–37
Healed the blind man at Bethesda
8:22–26
Healed blind Barimaeus
10:46–52
18:35–43
Escaped from a hostile crowd
4:28–30
Caused a great catch of fish
5:1–11
Raised a widow’s son at Nain
7:11–17
Healed an infirm, bent woman
13:11–13
Healed a man with dropsy
14:1–4
Healed ten lepers
17:11–19
Healed Malchus’s ear
22:47–51
18:10
Turned water into wine
2:1–11
Healed nobleman’s son
4:46–54
Healed an infirm man at Bethsaida
5:1–15
Healed a man born blind
9:1–41
Raised Lazarus
11:1–44
Caused a second great catch of fish
21:1–14
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Mr 8.11). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.



Names for Satan


Satan, or Adversary, is the most frequently used name for the devil in the N.T., appearing over fifty times. Devil, or slanderer, is used over thirty times. Satan, the personification of evil in this world, is the great superhuman enemy of God, his people, and all that is good. His character is vile and evil, and he is portrayed as the great deceiver. So sly is Satan in his deception that he sometimes transforms himself into an angel of light (2 Cor. 11:14).
Regarded by many scholars as a fallen angel, Satan has a continuing ambition to replace God and have other worship him (Matt. 4:8, 9). He constantly tempts people to try to entice them into sin (1 Thess. 3:5). In falling from God’s favor, Satan persuaded other angels to join him in this rebellion (Rev. 12:9). When Christ returns, Satan will be defeated and ultimately cast into the lake of fire (Rev. 20:1–10)
The following names or titles for Satan in the N.T. throw further light on the devil’s character.
Title
Biblical Reference
Beelzebub, ruler of demons
Matthew 12:24
The wicked one
Matthew 13:19
The enemy
Matthew 13:39
Murderer
John 8:44
A liar
John 8:44
Ruler of this world
John 12:31; 14:30
God of this age
2 Corinthians 4:4
Prince of the power of the air
Ephesians 2:2
Ruler of darkness
Ephesians 6:12
The tempter
1 Thessalonians 3:5
The king of death
Hebrews 2:14
A roaring lion
1 Peter 5:8
Adversary
1 Peter 5:8
Angel of the bottomless pit
Revelation 9:11
Abaddon (Destruction)
Revelation 9:11
Apollyon (Destroyer)
Revelation 9:11
The dragon
Revelation 12:7
Accuser of our brethren
Revelation 12:10
Serpent of old
Revelation 20:2
The deceiver
Revelation 20:10
New Geneva study Bible. 1997, c1995 (electronic ed.) (Mr 1.21). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.




The “Messianic Secret” in Mark


On several occasions in the Gospel of mark Jesus tells someone not to tell, either who He is, or what they have seen that would demonstrate who He is. This is called the Messianic Secret. Why did Jesus want to keep his identity as Messiah a secret?
     To avoid being considered just a “miracle worker.” Note that many of these commands follow miracles. Jesus did not want people to follow Him just to see Him do tricks. He came as the Son of God to ring salvation and forgiveness from sin, not just physical healing and miracles.
     To avoid undue publicity which would hinder His mobility and ministry to His disciples. Note the result of the leper’s disobedience in 1:45.
     To avoid the mistaken notion of the type of Messiah He came to be. He came to suffer and serve and sacrifice Himself, not simply to display His power (cf. 10:45).
     To avoid the premature death that increased popularity could bring.
NOTE: Following His transfiguration, which displayed His glory to the disciples, Jesus tells them not to speak of this event “till the Son of Man had risen from the dead” (9:9). Following His resurrection and vindication, the identity of Messiah and the character of His mission is properly understood in its full scope. After the resurrection, all believers are sent into the world “to tell” (cf. Matthew 28:7, 8, 18–20; Mark 16:7; Luke 24:9,
New Geneva study Bible. 1997, c1995 (electronic ed.) (Mr 1.35). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.



Prominent Jewish Religious and Political Groups


 Name and Selected References DescriptionAgreement with Jesus Disagreement with Jesus 
 PHARISEES
Matthew 5:20
Matthew 23:1-36
Luke 6:2
Luke 7:36-47
 Strict group of religious Jews who advocated obedience to the most minute portions of the Jewish law and traditions. Very influential in the synagogues.   Respect for the law, belief in the resurrection of the dead, committed to obeying God's will.  Rejected Jesus' claim to be Messiah because he did not follow all their traditions and associated with notoriously wicked people. 
 SADDUCEES
Matthew 3:7
Matthew 16:11, 12
Mark 12:18
 Wealthy, upper class, Jewish priestly party. Rejected the authority of the Bible beyond the five books of Moses. Profited from business in the Temple. They along with the Pharisees, were one of the two major parties of the Jewish high council.   Showed great respect for the five books of Moses, as well as the sanctity of the Temple.  Denied the resurrection of the dead. Thought the Temple could also be used as a place to transact business.   
 TEACHERS OF RELIGIOUS LAW
Matthew 7:29
Mark 2:6
Mark 2:16
 
 Professional interpreters of the Law-who especially emphasized the traditions. Many teachers of religious law were Pharisees.    Respect for the law. Committed to obeying God.  Denied Jesus' authority to reinterpret the law. Rejected Jesus as Messiah because he did not obey all of their traditions. 
 SUPPORTERS OF HEROD
Matthew 22:16
Mark 3:6
Mark 12:13

 A Jewish political party of King Herod's supporters.  Unknown. In the Gospel they tried to trap Jesus with questions and plotted to kill him.  Afraid of Jesus causing political instability. They saw Jesus as a threat to their political future at a time when they were trying to regain from Rome some of their lost political power.  
ZEALOTS
Luke 6:15
Acts 1:14 
 A fiercely dedicated group of Jewish patriots determined to end Roman rule in Israel.   Concerned about the future of Israel. Believed in the Messiah but did not recognize Jesus as the one sent by God. Believed that the Messiah must be a political leader who would deliver Israel from Roman occupation. 
 ESSENES
none
 Jewish monastic group practicing ritual purity and personal holiness.   Emphasized justice, honesty, commitment.  Believed ceremonial rituals made them righteous. 




Gospel Accounts found only in Mark



 Section Topic Significance
4:26-29  Story of the growing seed We must share the Good news of Jesus with other people, but only God makes it grow in their lives. 
 7:31-37 Jesus heals a deaf man who could hardly talk Jesus cares about our physical as well as spiritual needs.  
 8:22-26 Jesus heals the blind man at Bethsaida Jesus is considerate because he makes sure this man's sight is fully restored.  





Jesus' Prophecies in the Olivet Discourse


 Type of Prophecy Old Testament References Other New Testament Reference
 The Last Days
Mark 13:1-23
Matthew 24:1-28
Luke 21:5-24
 
 Daniel 9:26
 Daniel 11:31
 Joel 2:2
 
 John 15:21
 Revelation 11:2
 1 Timothy 4:1, 2
 The Second Coming of Christ
 Mark 13:24-27
 Luke 21:25-28
 Matthew 24:29-31
 
 Isaiah 13:6-10
 Ezekiel 32:7
 Daniel 7:13, 14
 
 Revelation 6:12
 Mark 14:62
 1 Thessalonians 4:16





Evidence that Jesus actually died and arose


 Proposed Explanations for Empty Tomb Evidence against These Explanations Reference
  •  Jesus was only unconscious and later revived
  •  A Roman soldier told Pilate that Jesus was dead.
  • The Roman soldiers did not break Jesus' legs because he had already died, and one of them pierced Jesus' side with a spear.
  • Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus wrapped Jesus' body and placed it in the tomb.

  •  Mark 15:44, 45
  • John 19:32-34

  • John 19:38-40
  •  The women made a mistake and went to the wrong tomb.
  •  Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joseph saw Jesus placed in the tomb.

  • On Sunday morning Peter and John also went to the same tomb. 
  •  Matthew 27:59-61
  • Mark 15:47
  • Luke 23:55
  •  John 20:3-9     
  •  Unknown thieves stole Jesus' body.
  •  The tomb was sealed and guarded by Roman soldiers. 
  •  Matthew 27:65, 66
  •  The disciples stole Jesus' body.
  •  The disciples were ready to die for their faith. Stealing Jesus' body would have been admitting that faith was meaningless.  
  •  Acts 12:2
  •  The religious leaders stole Jesus' body to produce it later 
  •  If the religious leaders had taken Jesus' body, they would have produced it to stop the rumors of his resurrections. 
  •  None





The Blueprint



  1. BIRTH AND PREPARATION OF JESUS, THE SERVANT

          (1:1-13)

Jesus did not arrive unannounced or unexpected. The Old Testament prophets had clearly predicted the coming of a great one, sent by God himself, who would offer salvation and eternal peace to Israel and the entire world. Then came John the Baptist, who announced that the long-awaited Messiah had finally come and would soon be among the people. In God’s work in the world today, Jesus does not come unannounced or unexpected. Yet many still reject him. We have the witness of the Bible, but some choose to ignore it, just as many ignored John the Baptist in his day.

  1. MESSAGE AND MINISTRY OF JESUS, THE SERVANT

          (1:14-13:37)

Jesus had all the power of God; He raised the dead, gave sight to the blind, restored deformed bodies, and quieted stormy seas. But with all this power, Jesus came to humanity as a servant. We can use his life as a pattern for how to live today. As Jesus served God and others, so should we.

  1. DEATH AND RESURRECTIONS OF JESUS, THE SERVANT

          (1:14-13:37)

Jesus came as a servant, so many did not recognize or acknowledge him as the Messiah. We must be careful that we don’t reject God or his will because he doesn’t quite fit our image of what God should be.