Graphics of Genesis




Genesis's Time

Creation

Noah 

 Abram born

Abran entres Canaan 

Isaac born 

 Jacob & Esau born

Jacob flees to Haran 

Joseph born 

Joseph sold into slavery 

Joseph rules Egypt 

Joseph dies  

 ?

 ?

 2166 B.C
(2000 B.C)

 2091
(1925)

2066
(1900) 

 2006
(1840)

 1929
(1764)

 1915
(1750)

1898
(1733)

 1885
(1720)

 1805
(1640)

 





Vital Statistics


Purpose:

  To record God's creation of the world and his desire to have a people set apart to worship him 

 Author: 

 Moses

 Original audience:

 The people of Israel 

 Date written: 

 1450-1410 B.C

 Where written: 

 In the wilderness during Israel's wanderings, somewhere in the Sinai peninsula.

 Setting:

 The region presently known as the Middle East.  

 Key verse:

 "So God created human beings in his own image. In the image of God he created them; male and female he created them" (1:27)

 'I will make you into a great nation. I will bless you and make you famous, and you will bless those who bless you and curse those who treat you with contempt. All the families on earth will be blessed through you" (12:2, 3) 

 Key people:

 Adam, Eve, Noah, Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Rebekah, Jacob, Joseph. 



Events of the Flood


Month
Day
Events
Number of Days
2
10
Noah enters ark; God shuts door.
7
2
17
Rains fall; waters rush from seas. Ark floats.
40
3
27
Rain stops. Flood rushing in and water still rising.
110
7
17
Ark touches bottom on high mountains. Water stops rising; stationary.
40
8
27
Waters settle 15 cubits.
34
10
1
Ark on dry ground. Noah waits.
40
11
11
Noah sends raven; waits.
7
11
18
Noah sends dove; it returns with olive leaf.
7
11
25
Noah sends dove; it does not return. Noah waits.
22
12
17
Water recedes.
14
1
1
Noah sees dry land; waits.
56
2
27
Noah commands all to abandon the ark. Total time on ark.
377
Richards, L., & Richards, L. O. (1987). The teacher's commentary. Includes index. (42). Wheaton, Ill.: Victor Books.



Chart of the Primeval and Patriarchal Periods

Chapters
Key Word
Theme and Message
Gen. 1
Creation
The universe is personal
2
Man
Men are made in God’s image
3–4
Sin
Sin introduces death’s reign
6–9
Judgement
The universe has moral order
12; 15
Covenant
God’s promise reveals purpose in the universe
12–21
Sinful
Abraham and all men fall short
22–24
Faith
Faith in God is “counted . . . for righteousness”
25–36
Transmission
The covenant promise was transmitted through Issac and Jacob
37–50
Egypt
God providentially orders events to work out His purposes

Richards, L., & Richards, L. O. (1987). The teacher's commentary. Includes index. (72). Wheaton, Ill.: Victor Books.


Focus of Genesis 


Focus

Four Events
1:1 to 11:9

Four People
11:10 to 50:26

Divisions

Creation: 1:1 to 2:25

Fall: 3:1 to 5:32

Flood: 6:1 to 9:29

Nations: 10:1 to 11:9

Abraham: 11:10 – 25:18

Isaac: 25:19 – 26:35

Jacob: 27:1 – 36:43

Joseph: 37:1 – 50:26

Topics

Beginning of the Human Race

Historical

Beginning of the Hebrew Race

Biographical

Place

Fertile Crescent (Eden—Haran)

Canaan (Haran—Canaan)
Egypt (Canaan-Egypt)

Time

c.2000+ Years (c.4004-2090B.C.)

193 Years (2090-1897B.C.)

93 Years (1897-1804B.C.)

 




 Some of  the Gods of Egypt


The God

Ruler over

How symbolized

Aker

Earth-god - Helper of the dead.

Two lion heads

Aton

Sun – god

 

Bes

Protection at birth – Dispenser of virility

Group of demons

Heket

Primordial goddess

Frog

Isis

Goddess of life and healing

Human

Khepri

Primordial god – Rising sun

Scarabaeus (beetle)

Khnum

Giver of the Nile – Creator of mankind

Human with ram’s head

Mut

“Eye of the sun”

Vulture or human

Nut

Sky goddess – Mother of heavenly bodies

 

Osiris

Dead Pharaohs – Ruler of dead, life, vegetation

 

Ra

God of sun, earth, and sky – National God

Human with falcon head

Selket

Guardian of life – Protector of dead

Scorpion

Seth

God of chaos, desert and storm, crops

 

Sothis

God of Nile floodwaters

 

Thermuthis

Goddess of fertility and harvest; fate

Serpent

 



Major Genealogies of the Bible

Genealogy
Purpose
The descendants of Adam (Gen. 5:1–32)
Shows the line from Adam to Noah, through whom God “started over again” to remake the world.
The descendants of Noah (Gen. 10:1–32)
Shows the origin the three major people groups of the world, and of the tribes and nations that play a major role in the biblical narrative (see “The Birth of the Nations” at Gen. 10:1).
The descendants of Shem (Gen. 11:10–32)
Traces the line from Noah’s son Shem to Abraham.
The descendants of Esau (Gen. 36:1–43)
Gives the principal families of the Edomites, the cousins of the Israelites with whom they regularly feuded (see “The Edomites—Perpetual Enemies of Israel” at Gen. 36:9, and “Obadiah: An Ancient Tale of Twin Brothers” at the Introduction to Obadiah).
The descendants of Jacob (Gen. 46:8–27)
Gives the principal families of the Israelites.
Moses’ first census of Israel (Num. 1:1–46)
Gives the heads of the families that left Egypt in the Exodus.
Moses’ second census of Israel (Num. 26:1–65)
Gives the heads of the families of the generation that entered the Promised Land; was used to divide the land among the tribes.
The genealogy of Israel (1 Chr. 1–9)
Reviews the principal families of the Israelites after the Babylonian exile as a way of remembering the nation’s history and setting the stage for the account of David’s kingdom.
The lists of people returning from the Babylonian exile (Ezra 2:1–63; 8:1–14; Neh. 7:6–72)
Gives the principal families that returned to rebuild Judah; was probably used to establish ownership of lands in order to return them to their rightful owners.
Matthew’s genealogy of Jesus Christ (Matt. 1:1–17)
Establishes Jesus as the Son of David.
Luke’s genealogy of Jesus Christ (Luke 3:23–38)
Establishes Jesus as fully human, yet also the Son of God.
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Gn 1.1). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.



Personality Profile: The Three Sons of Noah

Shem
Ham
Japeth
Names mean:
“Renown” or “name. ”
“Hot. ”
“God will make spacious. ”
Home:
After the Flood, perhaps near Mount Ararat
Family:
See “The Family of Noah” at Gen. 5:32.
Was the father of five sons—Elam, Ashur, Arphaxad, Lud, and Aram (Gen. 10:22); listed as an ancestor of Jesus Christ (Luke 3:36).
Was the father of four sons—Cush and Put (believed to have settled in parts of Africa), Mizarim (believed to be the father of the Egyptians), and Canaan (believed to have settled Phoenicia and Palestine).
Was the father of seven sons—Gomer, Magog, Madai, Javan, Tubal, Meshech, and Tiras.
Best known today as:
Survivors of the Flood.
The father of five Semitic peoples—Persia, Assyria, Chaldea, Lydia, and Syria—making Shem the father of the ancient Middle Eastern nations generally and the Hebrews in particular (through Arphaxad’s descendant Eber).
The father of the Canaanites. Canaan was cursed by Noah when his father Ham “saw the nakedness” of Noah (Gen. 9:20–27). The Canaanites were eventually disposessed of their land by the Israelites.
The father of fourteen Indo-European nations mentioned in Gen. 10. Some of these may be identified as: the ancient Cimmerians (from Gomer), the Scythians (from Magog), the Medes (from Madai), the Ionians or Greeks (from Javan), the peoples of eastern Turkey (from Tubal and Meshech), and certain Aegean islanders, perhaps the Etruscans (from Tiras)
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Gn 9.1). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.





Women Who Experienced Childlessness


Name
Description
Sarah (Gen. 16:1–2; 18:11–12; 21:6–7)
Used her maid Hagar as a surrogate childbearer, but then rejected both Hagar and the child, Ishmael; eventually gave birth to Isaac, changing laughter of pain to laughter of joy.
Rebekah (Gen. 25:21)
Conceived after her husband Isaac prayed to the Lord on her behalf; gave birth to twins, Esau and Jacob
Rachel (Gen. 29:31–30:24)
Driven by despair, used her maid Bilhah to compete with the other wife of her husband Jacob, her older sister Leah; eventually gave birth to Joseph and later Benjamin, whose birth caused her death.
Manoah’s wife (Judg. 13)
Told by God that she would conceive a son who would be a Nazirite; gave birth to Samson, a judge of Israel.
Hannah (1 Sam. 1)
Desperately prayed for a son, whom she vowed to dedicate to the Lord; gave birth to Samuel, a judge of Israel.
Elizabeth (Luke 1:5–25, 57–66)
Conceived after her husband Zacharias was promised a son who would be the forerunner to the Messiah; gave birth to John the Baptist.
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Gn 18.11). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.




Relatives Who Married Each Other


Husband
Wife
Relationship
CAIN
UNKNOWN
Brother/sister (assumed)
NAHOR
MILCAH
Uncle/niece
ABRAHAM
SARAH
Half brother/sister
ISAAC
REBEKAH
First cousins once removed; also first cousins twice removed
JACOB
LEAH/RACHEL
First cousins; also second cousins once removed; also second cousins twice removed
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Gn 24.3). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.






Travelers

Description of Trip


Terah and his family
Migrated from Ur to Haran (Gen. 11:31–32).
Abraham and his family
Moved from Haran to the land of Canaan in response to God’s call (Gen. 12:1–5).
Abraham and his family
Temporarily relocated to Egypt to escape a severe famine in Canaan (Gen. 12:10); eventually returned to Canaan and lived a nomadic life in the region around Hebron and the central hill country of Shechem.
Jacob
Traveled from Beersheba to ancestral Haran to find a wife; lived in Haran for some 20 years before returning to Shechem (Gen. 28–33).
Joseph
Wandered north from Hebron to look for hid brothers; after finding them near Dothan, was sold to slave traders who took him to Egypt, far to the south (Gen. 37), where he spent the rest of his life.
Jacob and his family
Migrated to Egypt to escape a famine in Canaan (Gen. 42–46).
Moses
Fled from Egypt to Midian after killing an Egyptian (Ex. 2:14–15); lived there 40 years before running to lead Israel out of slavery (4:19–20).
Joseph and his brothers
Traveled to Canaan and back to bury their father at Machpelah with the other patriarchs and their wives (Gen. 50:1–14).
Israelites
Migrated from Egypt to Canaan after 430 years of slavery; trip took more than 40 years (Ex. , Lev. , Num. , Deut. ).
Naomi and Ruth
Relocated from Moab to Naomi’s ancestral home, Bethlehem (Ruth 1).
Saul
Journeyed from Gibeah to Ramoth to be anointed Israel’s first king (1 Sam. 9:1–10:1).
Samuel
Traveled from Ramah to Bethlehem to anoint David as king (1 Sam. 16:1–4).
David
Moved from Philistia to Hebron to become king; led a force from Hebron to Jerusalem to capture it and make it his capital (2 Sam. 2:1–4; 5:7–12).
Solomon
Traveled from Jerusalem to Gibeon to offer sacrifices and ask for wisdom (1 Kin. 3:4–9).
Queen of Sheba
Traveled north from Africa to Jerusalem to pay a royal visit to Solomon (1 Kin. 10).
Elijah
Ran from Jezreel into the wilderness to escape Queen Jezebel’s wrath (1 Kin. 18:46–19:4).
Jonah
Fled by ship to avoid God’s command to prophesy against Nineveh; later went there (Jon. 1–4).
Captives from Judah
Taken from Jerusalem to Babylon; later allowed to return to Judah (2 Chr. 36:20; Ezra 1).
Ezra
Traveled from Babylon to Jerusalem to revive the Law in Israel (Ezra 7:1–10).
Nehemiah
Traveled from Babylon to Jerusalem to rebuild the city wall (Neh. 1–2).
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Gn 28.22). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.



Major Women in the Book of Genesis

Name
Description
Eve (2:18–4:26)
The first woman, who chose to eat what God had forbidden, resulting in expulsion from the Garden of Eden and separation from God.
Sarai/Sarah (17:15–18:15; 20:1–21:13; 23:1–2)
A woman whose child late in life was the fulfillment to God’s covenant promise.
Hagar (16:1–16; 21:9–21)
A slave who was abused by her mistress; but God remembered and rescued her. Hagar was the first woman in the Bible to call out a name for God (“You-Are-the-God-Who-Sees, ” Gen. 16:13).
Lot’s Daughters (19:30–38)
Two women widowed by the destruction of Sodom, who chose incest rather than barrenness.
Rebekah (24:1–67; 25:20–26; 27:5–46)
A cunning woman who perceived a way to capture her husband Isaac’s blessing for her favorite son.
Rachel and Leah (29:9–30:24)
Rival daughters of a manipulative father (Laban), and rival wives to the same man (Jacob).
Dinah (34:1–31)
A victim of rape who was avenged by her brothers, who considered the assault on her as an assault on their family.
Tamar (38:1–20)
A widow who resorted to prostitution to obtain justice and support from her father-in-law.
Potiphar’s Wife (39:7–20)
A vindictive temptress who used sexual harassment to slander an innocent man.
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Gn 29.31). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.




Concubines in the Bible

Concubines
Owners
Lot in Life
Hagar (Gen. 16)
Abram (Abraham) and Sarai (Sarah)
Functioned as a concubine through Sarah’s insistence; gave birth to Ishmael.
Reumah (Gen. 22:24)
Nahor, Abraham’s brother
Bore four sons to Nahor
Keturah (Gen. 25:1; 1 Chr. 1:32)
Abraham
Bore Abraham six sons. (Abraham also had other concubines who bore him sons, Gen. 25:6)
Bilhah (Gen. 30:1–8)
Jacob and Rachel
Bore two sons to Jacob; later sexually involved with Reuben, Jacob’s oldest son (Gen. 35:22).
Zilpah (Gen. 30:9–13)
Jacob and Leah
Gave birth to two of Jacob’s twelve sons.
Timna (Gen. 36:12)
Eliphaz, Esau’s son
Gave birth to Amalek, the father of the Amalekites.
Unnamed (Judg. 8:31)
Gideon
Gave birth to a son named Abimelech.
Unnamed (Judg. 19)
Unidentified Levite of Ephraim
Proved unfaithful to her husband before returning to her father’s house in Bethlehem; retrieved by her husband, but on the way home was gang-raped by men from Gibeah, an assault from which she died (Judg. 20–21).
Rizpah (2 Sam. 3:7)
Saul
Bore two sons, Armoni and Mephibosheth; said by Ishbosheth, Saul’s son, to have been used sexually by Abner, Saul’s commander-in-chief—an act that would have amounted to claming the throne; kept vigil aver the bodies to her sons for several months after their death (2 Sam. 21:10).
At least ten unnamed women (2 Sam. 5:13; 15:16)
David
Bore David numerous children; violated by David’s son Absalom (2 Sam. 16:21–22); the ten lived out their days in virtual widowhood after the rebellion of Sheba (20:1–3).
Three hundred unnamed women (1 Kin. 11:3)
Solomon
Helped to turn Solomon’s heart away from the Lord.
Ephah (1 Chr. 2:46)
Caleb
Bore three sons to Caleb.
Unnamed Syrian woman (1 Chr. 7:14)
Manasseh, Jacob’s son
Bore him Machir, the great-grandfather of Zelophehad (see “The Jubilee Factor” at Num. 36:4).
Sixty unnamed women (2 Chr. 11:21)
Rehoboam, Solomon’s son
Helped enable Rehoboam to have 28 sons and 60 daughters.
Esther (Esth. 2:13–16)
King Ahasuerus of Persia
Was selected from the king’s harem to become queen, a position from which she helped to save her people the Jews from genocide.
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Gn 1.1). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.



 The Edomites—Perpetual Enemies of Israel


The Edomites and Israelites were descended from Isaac’s two sons Esau and Jacob, respectively. Yet despite this kinship, the two peoples feuded repeatedly throughout biblical history, as the following table shows:
ISRAELITES …
EDOMITES …
Denied the Israelites access to the King’s Highway during their journey to Canaan (Num. 20:14–21).
“Harassed” the Edomites during the time of Saul (1 Sam. 14:47).
(Doeg the Edomite, an official of Saul’s massacred the entire community of Nob, home to some 85 priests and their families, 1 Sam. 22:9–19).
Conquered Edom under David and stationed troops there (2 Sam. 8:13–14), fulfilling the prophecy of Balaam (Num. 24:18; David’s general Joab then carried out a campaign of genocide, 1 Kin. 11:15–16).
Opposed Saul under Hadad, a member of the royal family who had escaped Joab’s massacre (1 Kin. 11:14–22).
Conspired with the Ammonites and Moabites to raid Judah during Jehoshaphat’s reign, but were turned back (2 Chr. 20:1, 10).
Rebelled against Judah’s control during the reign of Joram (2 Kin. 8:20–22).
Returned Edom to their control when Amaziah captured Sela, the capital city (2 Kin. 14:7), and executed 10, 000 prisoners by throwing them off a cliff (2 Chr. 25:11–12).
Invaded Judah and took captives while Judah was being attacked by Pekah of Israel and Rezin of Syria (2 Kin. 16:5–6; 2 Chr. 28:16–17).
Rejoiced over Jerusalem’s fall to the Babylonians (Ps. 137:7).
Took over some of Judah’s southern territory and established settlements as far north as Hebron.
(Herod the Great, a descendant of the Edomites, ordered the massacre of baby boys in and around Bethlehem in an attempt to kill the baby Jesus, Matt. 2:16–18).
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Gn 36.9). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.



Principal Families in Genesis*


Parents
Children
Adam and Eve
(Gen. 2–4)
Cain, Abel, Seth, and many more
Lamech and Adah
Lamech and Zillah
(Gen. 4:19–24)
Jabal, Jubal
Tubal-Cain, Naamah
Noah and his Wife
(Gen. 6–10)
Ham, Shem, Japheth
Abraham and Sarah
Abraham and Hagar
Abraham and Keturah
(Gen. 11:29–25:11)
Isaac
Ishmael
Zimran, Jokshan, Medan, Midian, Ishbak, Shuah
Lot and an unspecified wife
Lot and his older daughter
Lot and his younger daughter
(Gen. 19:8, 26, 30–38)
Two daughters
Moab
Ben-Ammi
Isaac and Rebekah
(Gen. 24–28, 32, 33, 36)
Esau, Jacob
Jacob and Leah
Jacob and Rachel
Jacob and Bilhah
Jacob and Zilpah
(Gen. 29–31, 34–50)
Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Issachar, Zebulun, Dinah
Joseph, Benjamin
Dan, Naphtali
Gad, Asher
Judah and the daughter of Shua
Judah and his daughter-in-law Tamar (Gen. 38)
Er, Onan, Shelah
Perez, Zerah
*This list shows nuclear families only. However, “families” in the Bible means extended families that reach across generational and even geographical lines.
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Gn 1.1). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.




Examples of Theological Reflection in Scripture


Character
Location
Conclusion
Joseph (Gen. 45:5–8; 50:20)
Egypt
God, not his brothers, sold him into slavery; God used it to preserve His people.
Solomon (Eccl. 1:1)
Jerusalem
Apart from God, all of life is “vanity”—emptiness and futility.
Mordecai (Esth. 4:14)
Persia
God enabled Esther to become the queen of Persia in order to spare His people from genocide.
Paul (Philem. 15–16)
Writing to Philemon in Colosse
Onesimus the slave ran away in order that God might bring him to salvation and return him to his master as a brother in Christ (see “Perhaps. . . ” at Philem. 15–16).
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Gn 1.1). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.




 The Outcome of Jacob’s Predictions


Jacob’s pronouncement to his twelve sons of what would happen to them “in the last days” (Gen. 49:1) was highly individualized for each son:
Son
Name means
Outcome
Reuben
(Gen. 49:3–4)
“See, a Son”
Reuben paid a heavy price for his sin with Bilhah (Gen. 35:22). Though he was the firstborn son, he and his descendants did not receive the birthright (or double portion of the inheritance, Deut. 21:17), which went to Joseph’s two sons instead (Gen. 48:8–16; 1 Chr. 5:1).
Simeon
(49:5–7)
“Heard”
Simeon and Levi spearheaded the massacre of Shechem’s family and city (Gen. 34:25). Over time, the tribe of Simeon was largely assimilated into Judah.
Levi
(49:5–7)
“Attached”
Levi Joined Simeon in the attack on Shechem (Gen. 34:25). His descendants were given no land of their own in Canaan, though they were allowed to live in designated Levitical cities (see Josh. 21:1–3).
Judah
(49:8–12)
“Praise”
Judah was a leader among the brothers, and his descendants became the tribe of kings, and ultimately of the Messiah.
Zebulun
(49:13)
“Dwelling”
The tribe of Zebulun inherited much of the heavily traveled Galilee region, including Nazareth, the hometown of Jesus.
Issachar
(49:14–15)
“Wages”
The tribe of Issachar inherited rich agricultural lands in the valley of Jezreel (see 2 Kin. 9:37). This caused them of prosper materially, but compromise politically.
Dan
(49:16–18)
“Judge”
It could be that the tribe of Dan tended not to support the other tribes militarily. When they were unable to conquer some of their own allotted territory, a group of Danites migrated far to the north and conquered the isolated city of Laish, renaming it Dan. Later, this became a principal center of idolatry (1 Kin. 12:28–30)
Gad
(49:19)
“Troop” or “Fortune”
The tribe of Gad inherited land east of the Jordan River, but struggled to hold on to it.
Asher
(49:20)
“Happy” or “Blessed”
The tribe of Asher benefited materially by their close proximity to the Phoenician cities of Tyre and Sidon (see “Israel and the Phoenicians” at 2 Chr. 9:21).
Naphtali
(49:21)
“My Wrestling”
The tribe of Naphtali failed to completely drive out the Canaanites (Judg. 1:33). Their territory was ravaged by the Syrian king Ben-Hadad (1 Kin. 15:20), and later they were the first Israelite tribe to be deported by the Assyrians (2 Kin. 15:29).
Joseph
(49:22–26)
“He Will Add”
Joseph’s two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, inherited the family birthright (Gen. 48:8–16; 1 Chr. 5:1). The tribe of Ephraim became especially prominent, and its name was used to designate the northern kingdom that one day rivaled Judah.
Benjamin
(49:27)
“Son of the Right Hand”
The tribe of Benjamin was renowned for its warriors, particularly left-handed slingers. It was the tribe of Saul, Israel’s first king, and later sided with Judah in the divided kingdom.
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Gn 49.3). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.



Tribal Identities

Tribe
Famous Descendants
Reuben
Simeon
Levi
Aaron
Moses
Eli
Ezra
John the Baptist
Judah
Caleb
David
Solomon
Isaiah (?)
Jesus Christ
Dan
Samson
Naphtali
Barak
Elijah (?)
Gad
Asher
Anna
Isschar
Zebulun
Joseph
Joshua
Gideon
Samuel
Benjamin
Saul
Esther
Saul of Tarsus (Paul)
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Gn 49.8). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.




Joseph’s Complicated Resume

Position or Role
Industry
Location
Errand boy/shepherd (Gen. 37:12–17)
Livestock
Canaan
Slave (37:28; 39:1)
Slave trade
Southern Canaan and Egypt
Household servant (39:2–3)
Housekeeping
Egypt
Personal aide and manager (39:4–6)
Estate Management
Egypt
Convict (39:19–20)
Prison
Egypt
Trusty (39:21–23)
Prison security
Egypt
Advisor (40:1–41:36)
Prison and government
Egypt
Resource manager (41:33–55)
Government
Pharaoh’s palace
International broker (41:56–42:7)
International relations
Egypt
Immigration coordinator (46:28–47:12, 27)
Government
Egypt
Crisis manager (47:13–26)
Government
Egypt
Land broker (47:20)
Government
Egypt
Word in life study Bible . 1997, c1996 (electronic ed.) (Gn 1.1). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.





The Blueprint



  1. THE STORY OF CREATION (1:1-2:4)


 God created the sky, seas, and land. He created the plants, animals, fish, and birds. But he created human beings in his image. At times, others may treat us disrespectfully. But we can be certain of our dignity and worth because we have been created in the image of God.

  1. THE STORY OF ADAM (2:4-5:32)

  1. Adam and Eve

  2. Cain and Abel

  3. Adam’s descendants

  When Adam and Eve were created by God, they were without sin. But they became sinful when they disobeyed God and ate some fruit from the tree. Through Adam and Eve we learn about the destructive power of sin and its bitter consequences.  

  1. THE STORY OF NOAH (6:1-11:32)

  1. The Flood

  2. Repopulating the earth

  3. The tower of Babel

 Noah was spared from the destruction of the Flood because he obeyed God and built the boat. Just as God protected Noah and his family, he still protects those who are faithful to him today.

  1. THE STORY OF ABRAHAM (12:1-25:18)

  1. God promises a nation to Abram

  2. Abram and Lot

  3. God promises a son to Abram

  4. Sodom and Gomorrah

  5. Birth and near sacrifice of Isaac

  6. Isaac and Rebekah

  7. Abraham dies

 Abraham was asked to leave his country, wander in Canaan, wait years for a son, and then sacrifice him as a burnt offering. Through these periods of sharp testing, Abraham remained faithful to God. His example teaches us what it means to live a life of faith.

  1. THE STORY OF ISAAC (25:19-28:9)

  1. Jacob and Esau

  2. Isaac and Abimelech

  3. Jacob gets Isaac’s blessing

 Isaac did not demand his own way. He did not resist when he was about to be sacrificed, and he gladly accepted a wife chosen for him by others. Like Isaac, we must learn to put God’s will ahead of our own.

  1. THE STORY OF JACOB (28:10-36:43

  1. Jacob stars a family

  2. JAcob returns home

 Jacob did not give up easily. He faithfully served Laban for over 14 years. Latter, he wrestled with God. Although Jacob made many mistakes, his hard work teaches us living a life of service for our Lord.

  1. THE STORY OF JOSEPH (37:1-50:26)

  1. Joseph is sold into slavery

  2. Judah and Tamar

  3. Joseph is thrown into prison

  4. Joseph is placed in charge of Egypt

  5. JOseph and his brothers meet in Egypt

  6. Jacob’s family moves to Egypt

  7. Jacob and Joseph died in Egypt

 Joseph was sold into slavery by his brothers and unjustly thrown into prison by his master. Through the life of Joseph, we learn that suffering, no matter how unfair, can develop strong character in us.